Is politics in Europe still corrupt?

imagesA lot of people still think that the goverment in a lot of European countries are more or less corrupt. Especially in some of the easten European countries. But is this true or is it merely something based on historical views? Corrution is something that occurs in many places, just think about the most recent scandals in a big world wide organisation like FIFA. But how bad is it really when it comes to the goverments? Well in many of the western countries there are very little “real” corruption, of course some of the politicians are getting gifts like new clothes, cars and such from larger companies, in order to hopefully make them a bit more likely to pass a vote that could benefit that company. It could be something small, like wanting to replace the roof on their company building, even though it’s a historical roof that was to be preserved. But most of the times they still vote with their hearts, so it’s not a direct bribe.
On the other hand if we look a bit more to the west we have countries like Russia, where corrution is a bit more obvious, for instance we often hear about Putin pleases some of his rich friends by making business a little easier for them. However it’s far from as bad as it was just 20 years ago.

If we look at some of the other countries like Poland and Bulgaria, it’s still a major problem in some of the places. On a national scale things have improved quite a lot, and many of the larger organisations and corporations doesn’t get the same benefits as they used to. Corruption in Poland has actually declined over time in the recent years. In international rankings it is now below the world average, where it 20 years ago was ranking among the highest countries. Back when it was still a communist country it was pretty bad. There was actually as system called legalized corruption, which tells everything.
But since they had joined the EU and gotten a few really good politicians, things has changed for the better. The same goes for a lot of other similar countries like Bulgaria, on a national level corruption is not long a really issue, but in many of the local places it’s still big. For instance if a large company like Nyt Tag wants to build a new complex on a building ground that might have been reserved for a part, it’s not uncommon that the plans suddenly change, and the company Nyt Tag are suddenly allowed to build their complex on that spot instead. Things like that are still happening many places, and personally I think that it will take at least another 20 years before things have improved in that area. Another example would be that if a rich guy got pulled over for speeding, you are still often able to pay the officer a little extra to avoid the ticket and getting registered for speeding.

So you can say that politics in Europe isn’t as corrupt as earlier, but on a smaller scale it’s still happening quite a lot.